Being homeless in Paris during the lockdown

RAEL’S COMMENT:
There are about 30,000 people sleeping on the streets in Paris alone. With the lockdown, those who do not stay at home are subject to a Euro 135 fine … Does the police give such fines to those who sleep on the street? Just curious….

 

The daily lives of homeless people are made even more difficult by the pandemic, reports the Financial Times, which visited the streets of Paris. Non-profits that help the homeless are doing their best, but government aid remains limited.

Normally, some 3,500 homeless people live on the streets of Paris, where their tents and makeshift beds are often ignored by the crowd of passers-by who flock to the City of Light. They survive, making the rounds to raise some money or food, and thanks to the support of a myriad of services provided by charities and government agencies.

But our situation is not normal. While France is experiencing its fourth week of confinement due to coronavirus, the situation of homeless people in France has worsened further due to a freedom of movement that is now limited to soup kitchens, toilets and public showers, as well as day accommodation.

Where does the 30, 000 number come from as opposed to the 3,500 from the article?

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